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4 Comments

  1. Hey! Just saw your comment on my review, and then read yours. I am actually glad you have similar thoughts on the book, because I had only read good reviews of it so far. I had to take the objective tone also because this was the first book of the author I had read. I was almost scared to pick up Jaya, with this experience, and ofcourse the size of the book. But I did, and could not put it down for 2 whole days till I was done! Loved every bit of it.
    Haven’t read ‘The Pregnant King’ , and would definitely give it a try! This was a super-honest review in my opinion 🙂

  2. I am about half way through this book and should say that I haven’t had so negative an experience as you describe. However, as you observe, my expectation of understanding the significance of religious beliefs revolving around Shiva, is perhaps different from yours. I agree with you on the lack of analysis (read author’s value add) to prevailing interpretations around Shiva’s myths, and in fact see this work as nothing more than a collection of research-based mythological interpretations. However, I disagree with the observation that this is a religious textbook with a preachy tone.
    And, I do not think that this is a primer for those who are unfamiliar with hinduism, because unless one has a reasonably fair understanding of the hindu approach to spirituality (which most of the hindus sadly lack given the blind focus on rituals), this book stands the risk of significant misinterpretation. (For instance I came across another post that suggested that this book had references to racial / gender superiority: fair to dark skin, men to women etc. which is absurd. Further, the critic was confused with the concept of discriminating between spiritual/material needs, understanding of which is key to interpreting the main idea that is conveyed through the various metaphors sprinked throughout the book.)
    Further, I do not find this work boring and in fact feel a disappointing lack of details in many cases. And, I most definitely can’t see how an Amar Chitra Katha will do a better job.
    Finally, conveying such a deeply esoteric subject rich in references to sexuality as the Shiva mythology to a mainstream audience is a tremendously difficult job. And while this book is not exactly spectacular, I would definitely credit it for the attempt given the difficulty. And yes, given that I have not read Devdutt’s other books, I won’t make any comparisons with his other works.

  3. i am very much interested to know about each and ever religion. this is very sweet because recently i read your :”an idea about shiva” in the magazine “the week” in our library. i still want to know more about it. thanks for sharing this and continue your great work……….